How Does a Two Way Radio Work? (Asked by Neil from Reading)

Hi Neil,

Did you get a two way radio set from Santa by any chance? Lol.

Anyway, onto your question…

A two way radio basically is a radio that can send and receive signals. If a radio can both transmit and receive, it is known as a transceiver (see what they did there?) Two or more users can use a transceiver in order to communicate on a shared channel.

Essentially, a two way radio works by receiving radio waves through the air and broadcasting a return signal. The antenna on the radio houses a series of electrons, which dictate the channel being picked up by the user (different groups of electrons will respond to different channels). These electrons translate the radio waves into electrical impulses, which are then fed to a small processor. The processor then converts the impulses into a signal and the radio’s speakers then play that signal. The whole process, amazingly, is pretty much instant.

Two way radios convert sound into radio waves and also convert radio waves into sound. Ergo, I can speak to you, like so:

Chris: “Hi Neil. Can you hear me? Over”

Once I push the PTT (push to talk) button and speak, the vibrations of my voice shake a small membrane inside my radio’s microphone (not a million miles removed from the one that exists in the human ear). My radio’s processor then converts those vibrations into a simple electrical signal. The radio pushes the signal to the antenna, which then pushes it out on the audio channel selected.

The electrons in your antenna become excited (steady on there, fella!) and translate the waves into electrical impulses, which are then ‘decoded’ by the processor and played out via your speakers.

So, you hear this on your radio and you reply.

Neil: “Hey 2wayradionline. Yeah, I can hear you just fine. Thanks for the answer. Over”

Whereupon the entire process takes place all over again.

And so on…

I hope that answers your question. Have fun, 2wayradionline.co.uk!

How to Use a Walkie Talkie Headset

The basic functioning of walkie talkie headsets or two way radios is similar to standard radios. They receive RW or radio waves over the air. Once radios have received the radio waves, they convert it into sound. However, two way radios also convert sound to radio waves and transmit it back to another receiver. In simple words, these special types of radios can receive and transmit a radio signal simultaneously. Moreover, such radios use two different radio frequencies. This ensures that they can receive and send signals at the same time.

Most of the two way radios in modern times also allow scanning. Through scanning, a user can easily check if anyone is sending a transmission on a particular frequency. If the radio which is being used detects a private line tone, it will stop scanning and lock on that particular channel. This will allow the user to speak and transmit on the same frequency. As mentioned earlier, modern radios allow a person to use multiple channels. However, a walkie talkie headset should be able to generate and transmit radio waves in many different frequencies. All the frequencies should have minute fluctuations with each other.

Applications Uses of Walkie Talkie Headsets

These special type of radios have always been in demand even with all the mobile phones and laptops. Such radios facilitate easy accessibility and instant communication. Moreover, you can communicate with a bunch of people at the same time. With such a radio, you don’t have to call everyone individually and spend a lot of your hard-earned money.

These radios can be used for many different purposes. They are often used in public safety, recreation camps, military training and other businesses. Moreover, they can also be used as toys for children. Two way radios come in many different designs at affordable prices.

These type of radios can also be used in the medical industry. They can be quite useful in admitting patients or attending to people in emergency waiting areas. They also come in handy with outpatient clinics, pharmacies, and surgeries. Such radios can also be used in food industry. They can be used by waiters, kitchen staff and delivery staff in restaurants and so on.

Every person finds it easy to use these radios. Moreover, they are not as complex or difficult to use as mobile phones and other such communication devices. A walkie talkie headset is always the best option to communicate at work, play or home. Such radios can be used in many different situations. Even the most popular communication devices can not challenge the ease of use associated with such radios.

What Type Of Kenwood Radio Earpiece Should You Use With A Kenwood Radio

Although there are multiple types and designs of Kenwood radios out there, there are only two earpiece connectors compatible with these radios. Kenwood has been able to design their earpiece connectors in such a way that they are compatible with all their vast types of radios. A large percentage of Kenwood radios utilize the 2 pin earpiece connector. Among the most popular radios using the 2 pin earpiece connector include TK3000 and TK3300. The difference between the two-pin connector and the multi pin connector is straightforward. The former features two pins while the latter features multiple pins. However, their performance may not be the same depending on usability and the type of Kenwood radio.

The Two-Pin Earpiece Connector

The earpiece of the Kenwood 2 pin connector is featured by an incredible in-line push-to-talk button (PTT) with an in-built microphone. In addition, it comes with a complete clothing clip and a surveillance acoustic audio tube. This Kenwood earpiece connector can be used with most of the Kenwood radios and it normally sells out at a fair price.

This Kenwood radio earpiece connector is Kevlar reinforced for added security. It also features a secure fit tube connector as well as the lapel clip button. These features integrate themselves easily thus ensuring that the final sound output is of high quality. They are also designed with hi-tech microphones which help in reducing the noise level. Unlike other connectors, its wire PTT (microphone) and acoustic tube are separate. This is meant to reduce the amount of vibrations and echoes produced which would otherwise compromise the sound quality.

When it comes to style, the Kenwood radio earpiece connector is a RoHS compliant connector which has the ‘Over the ear’ FBI style acoustic tube which helps in monitoring sound levels. When you see that the plugs have worn out, there is no reason to worry because these pieces feature replaceable mushroom plugs. This is a changeable earpiece connector which allows you to change the connector to the accessory available. Apart from being compatible with Kenwood two-pin, it also works well other devices such as Motorola 2 pin and Icom 2 pin.

The Multi-Pin Earpiece Connector

The Kenwood multi-pin connected earpiece is a unique and tech savvy type of earpiece. But the earpiece is the same to the 2 pin connected earpiece in other areas. For example, both of them share very important features crucial to the audio type produced. Some of these identical features include an in-line PTT button, the surveillance acoustic tube and the clothing clip. When it comes to its value, it is a little bit pricy than the two-pin version.

The Kenwood Radio Earpieces

The performance andkenwood can be fostered by spending a little bit more on optional features such as the ‘swivel’ ear loop. Also, you can enjoy better use and comfort by including a steel clothing clip that reduces noise. Kenwood composes their earpieces from high quality cables featuring a toughened surface. The durable surface protects the cable from accidental strain and offers exemplary cushion to wear and tear. These pieces are lightweight allowing them to be carried and used in wherever you travel. They have been designed to withstand consistent strains common with all earpieces making it easier to be used in any environment.

Actually, the types of connectors which are compatible with Kenwood radios are limited compared to its counterparts. Nevertheless, the Kenwood two-pin and multi-pin connectors provide an excellent performance in all Kenwood’s radios making other connectors of no importance. But some people would say it is worth trying using other connectors to taste the difference. Kenwood radio earpieces consist of polycarbonate microphones which cushions your ears from unexpected high sound levels. When the acoustic tube gets damaged it can be easily replaced ensuring that communication remains uninterrupted. Also, the button or the controller is strategically placed allowing easier management of communication.

Most of Kenwood 2 way radios may only be connected by the two varieties of connectors. Thankfully, their equipment is among the best and it can hardly be rivaled. If you would want to have a Kenwood radio for your company, it is futile searching other compatible connectors because the aforementioned two works superbly. Many companies have started using Kenwood radio earpieces because of these hi-tech unparalleled features. Remember that, to gain advantage of uninterrupted communication, safe audio output and additional exclusive capabilities you will have to consider a good earpiece connector for your radio.

Faced with a tech tsunami, Motorola fights to preserve cop‑com franchise

As Chicago cops braced for protests in advance of the NATO and G-8 summits in 2012, hometown radio giant Motorola made what seemed like a grand gesture.

JOHN FITZHUGH / SUN HERALDMississippi Highway Patrol Trooper Calvin Robertson, MSWIN land mobile radio system at MHP Troop K headquarters on Wednesday Dec. 11, 2013.

The company, which for years has used tenacious marketing and clout to reign over the emergency radio business, donated to the city $1.8 million worth of telecom equipment that could beam data and videos to law enforcement officers shielding the world leaders.

Generosity wasn’t the only motive behind the gift.

In a letter, Motorola Vice President John Molloy said the company also could operate a network for the city as a “test platform” until year end and provide Chicago’s public safety agencies entree to the world of emergency broadband LTE – the new global standard for transmitting huge amounts of data at rocket speed.

Motorola’s gift was designed to keep on giving.

From Mississippi to Texas and California, the company now known as Motorola Solutions Inc. has reshaped its business strategy in the face of a technology tsunami that threatens to upend its decades-long hold on the emergency communications market.

While fighting to preserve its immense walkie-talkie franchise, Motorola has maneuvered to become a player in broadband, where it must contend with new and bigger competitors in a scrum for billions of dollars of taxpayer funds pledged for a coast-to-coast emergency data delivery network.DROPPED JAWS, PROTESTS OVER

Motorola’s aggressive push into broadband, however, is a cause for consternation among officials of the First Responder Network Authority, or FirstNet, the Commerce Department agency tasked with building the first nationwide public-safety communications system. To garner broadband business, Motorola has relied on many of the same strategies and deep customer relationships that helped it capture more than 80 percent of the radio market.

As McClatchy reported in a series of articles last year, the industry giant has landed scores of sole-source radio contracts and wielded enough pricing power to sell its glitzy handsets for as much as $7,000 apiece, at a taxpayer cost of hundreds of millions, if not billions, of dollars that could have been saved in a more competitive market.

At the request of three senior Democrats in the House of Representatives, the Department of Homeland Security’s inspector general, John Roth, recently ordered an audit to examine McClatchy’s disclosures and determine whether federal grant money has bankrolled biased contract awards to Motorola.

The new broadband network, backed so far by a whopping $7 billion federal commitment, is expected to spawn a competitive market involving names such as ATT, Verizon, Cisco, General Dynamics and Alcatel-Lucent.

How 4G broadband LTE (Long-Term Evolution) works

4G stands for the fourth generation of broadband, the same technology that beams data to your cell phone. It effectively works as a high-speed radio signal that relays tiny packets of data between the internet and base stations on cellular towers outfitted with antenna equipment and microwave dishes.

The cellular towers flash the data to first responders’ handsets or perhaps to a mobile unit mounted in a police car’s dashboard.

4G LTE can save lives: It can deliver images of suspects within seconds, where previously it could take 10 minutes or more, as well as offering live streaming of disaster or crime scenes.

While people around the world use 4G technology to make cell phone calls, because calls are frequently interrupted, it has not yet been deemed ready to produce voice communications reliable enough for public-safety agencies. The current public-safety standard requires that the connections operate reliably 99.999 percent of the time – or all but about five minutes per year.

What threatens Motorola is the possibility that technology advances could within a few years enable ruggedized cellphones to transmit voice communications as reliably as two-way radios, a development that eventually could crumble the company’s radio franchise, which serves thousands of public safety agencies.

One Motorola tactic for penetrating the new market has been to donate equipment, as the company did in Chicago.

It’s a way to “lock in future relationships and future opportunities,” said Steve Koman, a former Motorola employee who was a consultant to the city of Charlotte, N.C., when it sought unsuccessfully to build a broadband network a couple of years ago. Koman said he finds such equipment donations by a market kingpin to be troubling.

“I’ve always wondered if these kinds of gray-zone practices violate the spirit of federal antitrust laws,” he said, “because they appear to be a continuous attempt to corner the market.”

A Motorola executive vice president, Robert Schassler, contended in a phone interview that many companies routinely invite government agencies to join them in testing new products.

The 2012 donation of a mini-broadband network wasn’t Motorola’s first gift to Chicago, which has been buying the company’s radios since 1956.

In 2009, the company gave the city a mobile radio network to help protect members of the International Olympic Committee coming to town to weigh Chicago’s bid to host a future Olympics.

Motorola’s philanthropy was rewarded later with a $1.5 million no-bid contract from Cook County to use the donated equipment to build a “high-performance” data network for the city and county – a system that was doomed from the start because its radio bandwidth was too narrow to transmit data at high speeds, said Sophia Ansari, a spokeswoman for the county sheriff’s office. The county now plans to swap the equipment for new Motorola radios, she said.

As for the broadband LTE (for Long Term Evolution) equipment donated for the summits, the city has obtained a temporary license to build a test network but is still mulling what to do, said Melissa Stratton, a spokeswoman for Chicago’s Office of Emergency Management and Communications.

Charlotte also was a recipient of Motorola’s largesse before hosting the 2012 Democratic National Convention. Motorola loaned the city about 3,000 radios free of charge to assist state and federal law enforcement officials in communicating with one another.

Such gestures, which are not always trumpeted publicly, typically grow from carefully cultivated relationships that have helped Motorola steamroller competitors for nearly 20 years in the multibillion-dollar radio business.

I’ve always wondered if these kinds of gray-zone practices violate the spirit of federal antitrust laws.

The company’s formula: build top-quality equipment; dote on police, fire and sheriff’s departments; woo contracting officials; pursue every angle to gain a sole-source deal or an inside track, and where possible, embed equipment with proprietary features so it can’t interact with competitors’ products.

It’s worked so well that a single company – Motorola – has dominated state and federal two-way radio markets, untouched by federal antitrust regulators although there’s been little price testing to assure that taxpayers got the best deal.

Motorola executives make no apologies for their market supremacy.

“Motorola Solutions’ public safety success is because we offer the best solutions and service at competitive prices, because our customers trust in our products and commitment to stand behind them, and because of our continued investment in innovation,” said the company’s chief spokesman, Kurt Ebenhoch.

Motorola’s Schassler said the company that pioneered the first police radio in 1930 is the only manufacturer that has stood behind cops, firefighters and emergency medics “uninterrupted” for 85 years.

…our customers trust in our products and commitment to stand behind them…

That commitment has engendered strong loyalties from the nation’s more than 4 million first responders, legions of whom insist on toting a Motorola as their communication lifeline.

But to rivals and frustrated government officials, Motorola is the industry’s version of “Leave it to Beaver’s” unctuous Eddie Haskell (“You look lovely today, Mrs. Cleaver”), whose charms are but a cover for myriad connivances. Using an array of tactics, the company repeatedly has found ways to stick taxpayers with the priciest equipment when far cheaper options performed to the same standards.

Schassler was asked whether Motorola sales representatives propose ways for government officials to award sole-source contracts.

“No,” he replied.

State and local government officials have done the dirty work, frequently skirting laws or federal grant guidelines requiring competitive bidding.

Motorola officials acknowledged that the company’s seemingly ubiquitous sales force has wined and dined some government officials where state laws allow, but Schassler called that “a very, very rare occurrence” that is first approved by a company attorney.

However, two government officials who lacked authorization to speak for the record said the company has hosted state or local contracting employees in some of Las Vegas’ priciest restaurants .

Despite its scant experience in broadband, Motorola has been fastest out of the gate in applying the technology to public safety. In 2010, the company entered an eight-year partnership with the Swedish colossus Ericsson, a leading supplier of broadband equipment, especially the cores that serve as the brains for each network. Motorola also has partnered with cellular industry giant Verizon Wireless, and it has developed a handset that can both receive broadband data and enable voice transmissions over a standard two-way radio network.

The Schaumburg, Ill.-based firm has secured contracts to assemble four of eight federally funded emergency broadband pilot projects – in Los Angeles County, Harris County, Texas, the San Francisco Bay Area and Mississippi, though the latter two later collapsed because of negotiation impasses for leases of frequencies on the federal wireless spectrum. Motorola also is among five vendors approved to sell equipment for New Mexico’s statewide pilot project.

The company’s early success in the pilot projects has been controversial:

  • An official of Harris County, Texas, sent gasps through a hotel conference room in May 2011 when he said he handed Motorola the $7.5 million first stage of a pilot broadband network because the company told him “a great story,” according to two people who were present. Both insisted upon anonymity for fear of reprisals. The award in the county surrounding Houston drew protests from two major competitors because they weren’t invited to bid, even though most of the financing came from a Department of Homeland Security port security grant. Motorola and county officials contended the contract was competitively awarded, because it was written as a modification to a 2007 radio contract for which Motorola won the bidding.
  • In San Francisco, Motorola won a $50.6 million Commerce Department grant in 2010 to build the first metropolitan-wide emergency broadband network – a deal arranged by former Motorola sales executive Laura Phillips in her new job overseeing public safety grants to the region. Phillips was later fired amid outrage that the grant was awarded without approval from any of three major cities and 10 counties involved, said several current and former government officials who spoke anonymously because of the matter’s sensitivity. Phillips pointed to a Commerce Department audit that cleared her of improprieties.
  • Former San Jose Police Chief Chris Moore said he implored Motorola’s No. 2 executive, Mark Moon, to wait until a regional board approved the grant to avoid city and county protests. He said Moon responded: “I’d rather take the $50 million and bad publicity than not get the $50 million.” Motorola spokesman Ebenhoch said Moon doesn’t recall making such a remark and “strongly believes the statement to be inaccurate and false.”
  • While a joint authority representing Los Angeles County and more than 80 cities reviewed bids in 2011 for twin public-safety radio and broadband networks, Motorola added William Bratton, a former Los Angeles police chief and currently the New York police commissioner , to a lucrative post on its corporate board. A team led by Raytheon Corp. won the bidding, but Motorola threatened a suit, and a county lawyer urged nullifying the award because it might violate an arcane state law. During two more rounds of bidding, Motorola slashed its prices and ultimately won both contracts, worth a half-billion dollars.

FirstNet officials did not respond to requests for comment about Motorola’s dealings.

JOHN FITZHUGH / SUN HERALDMSWIN land mobile radio system at MHP Troop K headquarters on Wednesday Dec. 11, 2013.

Some members of Congress, including Democratic Rep. Anna Eshoo of California, have said a major reason they voted for a 2012 law allotting a bloc of the spectrum for public safety and financing a national broadband network was their hopes it would smash Motorola’s near monopoly in two-way radios.

Yet some say that Motorola is fighting for survival, especially if broadband handsets that sell for $500 to $1,000 can replace the pricey, more lucrative emergency radios. Already, spinoffs and layoffs have shrunk the company’s payroll from over 20,000 to 15,000 employees.

“The change that Motorola is getting hit with is no less substantial than what hit IBM or Kodak. It’s a technology wave,” said former Charlotte consultant Koman, referring to technology advances that overtook IBM Corp.’s mainframe computer franchise and Kodak’s film empire.

The company’s predicament “is actually life or death in this transition” because of its huge infrastructure, said a former senior Motorola executive, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid harming relationships.

If so, Motorola executives sure don’t seem panicked.

Schassler said he expects Motorola to accrue incremental gains from broadband projects while continuing to serve most of the nation’s 60,000 public-safety agencies with radio equipment for 10 years or more.

The reality is that Motorola, with tentacles reaching virtually every emergency agency in the country, may be miles ahead of the government in its planning.

Already, the Motorola-Ericsson combine has planted broadband network cores at Motorola’s Schaumburg headquarters, at Texas AM University to cover the Harris County system and in Los Angeles County.

New Mexico officials, whose network layout can easily be extended to the Mexican border, has requested permission to use the Texas core as part of its statewide broadband network. Because Motorola writes the software rules that determine what equipment can be used on that network, the company could be positioned to be the logical broadband provider for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency on the southern border.

To put that in context, if a Senate-passed immigration compromise became law, the number of border agents would soar over the next decade from 20,800 to 38,000, each needing a handset.

At a recent conference of financial analysts, Motorola CEO Gregory Brown sounded more eager than worried about broadband. He called the new emergency communications technology “the single best opportunity we have in front of us.”

Read more here: http://www.mcclatchydc.com/static/features/Motorola/Index.html?brand=sta#storylink=cpy

The Motorola DP1400 – The Most Efficient Two Way Radio

The DP1400 is an affordable, simple and portable two-way digital/analogue radio, which connects your workforce efficiently. Moreover, it has the flexibility to grow and expand with your business. This exceptional device combines the best features of two-way radio with the latest digital and analogue technology.

The Motorola DP1400 is an ideal choice for any individual who wishes to stay connected. This device is compatible with all the MOTOTRBO radios. It offers outstanding coverage, superior audio quality, long battery life and other benefits.

The company even offers the analogue only DP1400 model. It provides you with excellent voice communications. The device provides you with a way to clear and crisp digital voice communications whenever you’re ready. You will just need a basic software upgrade.

Regardless of your needs, the Motorola DP1400 provides you with a reliable, simple and cost effective communication solution. This will help you workforce connect, collaborate and coordinate to enhance productivity, efficiency and accuracy. Easy to use voice communication will make sure everything is done right the first time.

Key Features and Specifications

The frequencies of the device are UHF (403-470MHZ) and VHF (136-174MHZ). It’s available on 16 different channels. In the first look, you’ll notice a textured, large push-to-talk button. This makes it easier to use the device. There are also 2 programmable buttons to provide you with more convenience, and enhance operator efficiency.

A tricolor LED is available for visual feedback on operation status. You can also benefit from digital emergency via programmable buttons. This ensures rapid response from the workforce to critical incidents.

With sophisticated emergency calls, you can ensure the safety of your employees. The DP1400 also allows easy to use and quick group call capability. Moreover, PTT ID ensures system discipline and improved communications efficiency.

With the elegant channel searching schemes, you can ensure all the calls are received the first time. You also benefit from other key features, such as VOX capability, basic privacy, lone worker, programmable messaging capability, voice announcement of feature activation and channel changes. In addition to this, you can upgrade the software if you purchased the analogue-only model.

With all these features, you can be assured that the Motorola DP1400 will be an excellent buy. The device is available online at an affordable price. Purchasing the DP1400 on the Internet will be your best choice. With this device, your workforce will be more productive and efficient. Moreover, you will also be able to reap other benefits, including improved safety, privacy and communications. The Motorola DP1400 is an excellent choice for every business.

A Look At The Different Motorola Radio Earpieces

When it comes to discreet affairs, there definitely must be a discreet communication. Whether it is a security personnel or just a private group of designated people. Radios are used for communication between compatible devices within a specified location. Nevertheless, it would be less comfortable if someone talks via the radio and everyone hear the entire communication. Given the different types of two-way radios in the market, they usually come with a compatible earpiece. Among the most common radios are the Motorola radios. It would be super discreet and stylish if you had AMotorola radio earpiece to accompany your device. Some of the ideal Motorola 2-way radio earpiece connectors at EarpieceOnline include the following;

CP040 DP1400 2-Pin Connector

This Motorola 2-pin connector can work with a number of Motorola 2-way radios. It can also support some of the old version radios such as the DP1400, GP040 and the GP300. Some of the novel version of radios that are compatible to this earpiece include the DP1400 and the DP1000.

Features of the connector

* It has a changeable Foam sock so that you can replace if it has worn out.

* The earpiece also has a comfortable and flexible C-shaped earpiece.

* There is a secure moulded ear hook, for holding firm on the ear.

* It provides high quality audio.

* It comes with a noise reducing microphone for enhanced reception of incoming voice messages.

* The earpiece has a plastic that is covered by a label clip PTT button. The wire PTT is separated from the microphone and an ear hangar earpiece.

* It has a RoHS compliant feature and comes with Motorola earpiece 2-pin connector GP300/CP040/XTN/DP1400 and GP340 adapters.

DP3400 DP3600 Multi Connector

This is a multi pin connector works with all DP3000 DP4000 range of radios, with a 12-pin connector, it slots perfect onto the side of the DP radio and is securely screwed in so that the earpiece is securely locked in.

Features

* It is incorporated with Kevlar Reinforced for better surveillance and security.

* It has a secure fit tube connector, to avoid accidents of it cut from rough encounters.

* It offers a high quality audio.

* The earpiece has a Lapel clip PTT button and a separate wire PTT. That is separated from a noise reduction microphone and an acoustic tube. The acoustic tube runs over the ear, the FBI style.

* There is a changeable connector for flexible modification and flexible mushroom plugs that you can replace whenever.

DP2400 DP2600 multi connector

This is yet another different multi-pin connector that lets you connect to the DP2000 range of radios. This 8-pin connector fits on to the side of the radio and is locked in with a ‘pull out and slot-in’ connector, reducing the risk of broken screws or damage to the radio.

Features

* The acoustic tube runs over the ear and it has a secure fit connector for super surveillance and comfort.

* It has a separate wire PPT different from the acoustic tube and a microphone that reduces noise from the surrounding.

* The mushroom plugs are changeable and you can simply remove them when they are loose or worn out.

* It produces a high quality audio that reduces strain even when in a noisy environment.

GP340 GP680

This multi connector is compatible the GP range of radios, including the GP340 and GP680. The Connector is a 13-pin connector and is secured on the side of the radio, with a screw-in to secure the earpiece to the radio.

Features

* This multi connector has a high quality audio reception. That makes it comfortable to use anywhere, even in a crowded, noisy place.

* There is a microphone, which is separate from a wire PTT and an acoustic tube. The microphone is a noise reducing microphone, that helps to make the other end-user be comfortable.

* It has a RoHS compliant and an over the ear acoustic tube that holds firm to the ear.

* There is an adjustable connector that is versatile to other devices.

An elegant and well fitted earpiece will not only promote surveillance, but it will also be comfortable on the ear. That will ensure it is safe from damages in rough situations. A Motorola radio earpiece will be beneficial if you want a comfortable communication without having to speak loudly over the radio. Some of the radios are also slightly heavy, which makes them more comfortable when using an earpiece, that is worn beneath the clothing.

Blue Whales Make Startling Recovery

The California blue whale, the largest creature that has ever existed in the history of our planet, has finally recovered from centuries of whaling.

According to recent figures, the majestic creatures’ numbers are returning to historic levels, with an estimated 2,200 individuals currently living on the eastern side of the Pacific Ocean.

The figures, reported in the journal Marine Mammal Science, suggest that California blue whales are now at 97% of their original levels.

It is incredible that the species even survived in the area, considering that between 1905 and 1971, an estimated 3,400 whales were killed in the Pacific. Sadly, in Antarctica, where whaling was far more severe, blue whales only number at about 1% of their original population.

For thousands of years, whales of all kinds have been hunted and killed by Humans, usually for food. However, in the 17th century and into the 19th century, whale oil became a greatly valued commodity and let to an enormous amount of overhunting.

In the early part of the 20th century, whale harvesting emerged as a concept, which caused whale numbers around the world to plummet.

Despite bans on commercial whaling taking effect throughout the latter half of the 20th century, the countries of Japan, Norway and Iceland still slaughter 2000 whales a year between them. Since the first ban on commercial whaling was introduced in 1986, countries exploiting loopholes in the ban have killed over 30,000 whales. These include endangered species such as humpbacks and fin whales.

An adult blue whale can grow up to 33 metres in length and weigh up to 190 tonnes, but, despite their great size and strength, they are largely docile creatures that feed on plankton.

It is encouraging to know that whales, the majority of which are slow to mature and reproduce, can, if left alone, bounce back from Human predation. Clearly, it is not too late to save other whale species from extinction.

The news of the blue whale’s incredible resurgence comes in the same month as several countries agreed to ban the trade of certain shark and manta ray species that are threatened by overfishing.

Many of these species are used for traditional medicine or shark fin soup. Sharks, of course, pre-date dinosaurs and play such a large role in the ecosystems of our oceans that the natural world would be in a great deal of trouble without them.

The recent ban represents a landmark in shark protection, despite the shortsighted refusal of several nations (Canada, Greenland, Guyana, Japan and Iceland) to adhere to its rules. The new laws now protect five of the shark species that are most at risk from overfishing, along with manta rays. These laws will be supported across 180 countries, which is a monumental result.

As encouraging as these results are, it is still worth remembering that today there are only 3% of the whales that existed 200 years ago, when commercial whaling began in earnest.

To donate to the charity WDC (Whale Dolphin Conservation) go to this website

What Is an Earpiece?

From wisegeek.com “What Is an Earpiece?” (16 January 2012)

Broadly speaking, an earpiece refers to anything that functions by either covering the ear, or hanging near the ear. In this broad category are the parts of an eyeglass frame that extend over the ear, and any material specifically designed to fit into the ear and block off the entry of sound or water. The most common meaning of an “earpiece” however is an electronic device that converts electronic signals into sound waves, and directs them into the ear. In this context, the earpiece can also be called an electronic-acoustic transducer.

Originally, the earpiece was the only way of listening to electronically-generated audio signals. Thereafter, amplifiers were developed, and the role of earpieces became more a matter of personal preference than necessity. Nowadays, earpieces are used for convenience — where privacy is desired, or where mobility is important. Depending on its design, an earpiece can also be variously known as headphones, ear buds, stereo phones or headsets.

what is an earpieceEarpieces can be organized broadly into two categories — wired earpieces and cordless or wireless earpieces. The wireless types use either radio waves or infrared signals to connect to the signal sources. Earpieces for CD players, computers or mobile phones are some examples. A signal transmission link is used, like Bluetooth® or Wi-Fi.

The wired earpiece has to be physically attached to a signal source. To facilitate this, jacks at the end of the cords are inserted into the signal source. Jack sizes have been standardized, and the most common size is the 3.5 millimeter (about 0.2 inches) that was brought into the market by the Sony Company in 1979. The much older, 1/4 inch (about 6.4 mm) jack is now used only in professional equipment. When wiring up the stereo jacks, the tip is always the left channel, the portion in between is the right channel, and the outer sleeve is the ground.

The use of ear buds has a profound impact on how one perceives sound. This is because an earpiece feeds the sound directly into the eardrums, without the normal acoustic contouring by the listener’s head and outer ear that normal loudspeakers give scope for. Lacking these spatial references, the brain then imagines the sound to be in a straight line within the head and between the ears. This strips the sound of its 3 dimensional effect, otherwise produced by the normal loudspeakers.

From their shapes and sizes, earpieces can be placed into four categories. The circum-aural types have large pads that surround the outer ear. They are most commonly used in recording studios. The supra-aural headphones fit just over the ear, without fully surrounding it. Ear buds are designed to fit inside outer ear’s canal. However, they don’t fully cover the canal, and exterior sounds can still be heard around them. In contrast, canal phones, the fourth category, fit snugly into the ear’s canal, and effectively block off the external sounds.

Weitz Funds Analyst Corner – A Perspective On Motorola Solutions Inc.

Motorola Solutions (MSI) is a global leader in the sale of public safety communication infrastructure products and services as well as commercial radio systems. The company’s public safety portfolio, which represents over 60% of sales, provides first responders with mission critical, reliable and secure communications necessary for operating during storms, fires and security events where the inability to communicate can result in disastrous consequences. MSI designs, manufactures and installs the underlying infrastructure necessary to run a network as well as the end point radios and other devices carried by local personnel. The company’s commercial radio systems are sold to a diverse set of private and public entities which need a reliable, low cost, two-way push-to-talk method of communicating with customers and employees. We believe the company is the share leader in both of its primary businesses, serving over 10,000 customers located in more than 100 countries.

Old is New Again – With Higher Margins

Motorola was originally founded as Galvin Manufacturing in 1928 with the police radio as one of its first products. In its 86 years, the company invented or commercialized many leading edge products such as the AM/FM car radio, two-way police radio, walkie-talkie and the first cellular phone and network. Over time, Motorola became the owner of a wide range of technologies pertaining to semiconductors, personal computers, mobile phones, cable television and networking equipment. In the early 2000’s the company began a program to divest many of its disparate businesses. With the appointment of CEO Greg Brown in 2008, the divestment program was accelerated through the spin-off of the mobile phone unit and culminated with the sale of the enterprise mobility products business in the 3rd quarter of 2014. MSI management believes that as a result of being able to completely focus on what are two very similar businesses, it will be able to reduce selling and overhead expense and therefore increase operating margins by a significant amount.

Analog to Digital & LTE: Opportunity or Threat?

While shrinking its portfolio, Motorola was also investing in the public safety and commercial radio businesses. By refreshing and expanding the product portfolio MSI is well positioned to participate in what is expected to be a long-term transition by customers from aging analog to modern digital and LTE systems. MSI estimates that only 60% of its install base has moved to a digital infrastructure which among many improvements allows for better quality, more efficient use of spectrum and lower costs. The company has long protected its customers by making new equipment compatible with older versions so customers can transition to digital as needed without worrying about obsolescence.

A rush by MSI’s customers to comply with an FCC mandate caused some of the “digital transition” demand to be pulled forward from 2014 into 2012 and 2013. The resulting lull caused negative year-over- year sales growth and created doubts in investor’s minds about the durability of the public safety business. We anticipate that public safety revenues will return to growth in 2015.

Another source of opportunity for MSI is to sell LTE data capabilities into its installed base. LTE systems complement existing digital systems by offering features such as high-speed, two-way data transmission, real-time video and use of “big data” applications. However, Voice over LTE is barely reliable for consumer cell phone use (most consumer smart phones connect to a “3G” network for voice and use LTE for high speed data) much less critical public safety situations and therefore existing analog and digital voice products must still be used for the foreseeable future. Motorola has patiently built out its LTE offering while it waits for the U.S. Government to settle on rules and standards for a national intraoperative public safety LTE network. The process has taken longer than expected and combined with what we believe are unfounded worries that LTE will cannibalize revenue from the analog to digital transition has caused investors to express concern that LTE is more a threat than an opportunity. Our analysis leads us to believe that LTE has significant potential and will be additive to Motorola’s results.

Strong Capital Allocation

The separation of the mobile phone business in early 2011 left the company with significant net cash. Since then Motorola has repurchased over 30% of its diluted shares. Furthermore, the company has committed to moving to a net debt position thus making available more funds to shareholders. These funds, when combined with the proceeds from the sale of the enterprise mobility business are what enabled the company to authorize an additional $5b in repurchases in November 2014. If fully utilized at current prices the repurchase would reduce MSI’s share count by another 25%. In buying a substantial portion of its shares, MSI has materially increased per share value for remaining shareholders.

Attractive Value

We believe Motorola possesses an above average “moat,” good management and a shareholder-friendly capital allocation policy. As a result, we consider the MSI to be a high-quality business. With predictable long-term growth driven by public safety infrastructure upgrades and margin improvement resulting from focus and scale, we believe our discounted cash flow derived estimate of business in the mid $80’s represents a compelling opportunity for the Funds.

http://www.gurufocus.com/news/310722/weitz-funds-analyst-corner–a-perspective-on-motorola-solutions-inc

What Is a Covert Earpiece?

Can’t get over how low-priced the headset is now, a tremendous deal for any top-end product!

A covert earpiece is a miniature earpiece worn by an individual while being effectively hidden from plain view. It operates as a radio accessory in times when a user does not want other people to know she or he is communicating with others using radio earbuds. Also known as an invisible earpiece or a surveillance earpiece, a covert earpiece is often worn by government agents, corporate security personnel, undercover law enforcement officers and corporate as well as government spies.

covert earpiece

While many occupations require the use of a radio headset for communication, a covert earpiece is primarily used in instances where communication is of an extremely private and sensitive nature. This is common in cases of private security details and surveillance projects. Sometimes people also use a covert earpiece to defraud businesses and others. Examples of such instances would include someone using an invisible earpiece to cheat on an exam or to defraud a casino by receiving remote information while playing a game.

On-air television personalities may also use a covert earpiece, which is not distracting to viewers, but allows the person to hear relevant feedback from producers and engineers in order to make sure a taping or live appearance flows smoothly. Individuals may also wear a covert earpiece when making a public speech. By doing so, the speaker can receive important cues or changes in a speech without the audience even being aware that communication is taking place between someone located behind the scenes and the individual delivering the speech.

Some covert earpieces are accompanied by a discreet microphone, which enables two-way communication. These are commonly used by security forces with a need for such communication, particularly during surveillance operations. These types of accessories are not only convenient because they feature hands-free operation, but also because they allow undercover security forces to blend in with crowds without having to use a visible walkie-talkie system of communication.

A covert earpiece does not contain any visible wires and is designed to fit inside the ear without being noticeable to the general public. Some devices are even designed to fit on a pair of eyeglasses while amplifying sound inside a person’s ear. An inductive wire is sometimes worn around the person’s neck, but is covered by clothing so as not to be discovered by onlookers. This wire is not connected to the covert earpiece, but connects to a separate radio device that helps modulate sound.